Archive for: May, 2011

There are numerous ways to structure a trek because of two major factors. Firstly, you can almost always find supplies and accommodation locally because there are people living in even the most remote trekking areas. Secondly, there is inexpensive professional and nonprofessional labour available to carry loads and to work as guides and camp staff. The traditional trekking approach of a light backpack, stove, freeze-dried food and a tent is not appropriate in Nepal. ...

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Ncell, the Nepalese subsidiary of Swedish phone company TeliaSonera, has set up 3G base station of broadband mobile communications in the altitude of 5,200 metres, in the village of Gorak Shep. Gorak Shep is the last settlement on the side of Nepal on Everest Base Camp trek just before Everest Base Camp. “Today we made the world’s highest video call from Mount Everest Base Camp successfully,” announced the representative of Ncell. “The coverage of the network ...

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When Jimmy Roberts organized the first trek in Nepal, independent trekking was a logistical nightmare – no lodges, email, fax or direct-dial telephones. Most trekkers, therefore, joined group camping treks organized by adventure travel companies abroad, a tradition that has carried over to the present day. Many trekkers still travel on group treks organized abroad, but it’s also possible to arrange an organized trek directly with a company once you arrive in Kathmandu or Pokhara. ...

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No matter how fantastic trekking in Nepal is, I consider it to be my duty to tell you more about high altitude sickness, because only by knowing your enemy can you protect yourself from it. What is High Altitude Sickness In preparing to go trekking in the Himalayas of Nepal where the altitude of many trekking routes reaches 5,000 -5,700 meters above sea level, while trekking summits are located at altitudes of 6,100 -6,400 meters, it’s important ...

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